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How to Save an Image in GIF or JPEG Format

GIF and JPEG are the two image file formats most commonly used to show pictures on the Web. They are the only image formats accepted by the OASYS system. If you wish to include an image with your abstract, it must be one of these formats, and any image file name must therefore end with a .gif or .jpg file extension.

There are many ways to create an image in the required format:If you created the image using ChemDraw:

  1. Adjust the page setup to suit the complexity and orientation of the drawing
    • If the drawing is simple, use the normal paper size (e.g. 8.5" x 11")
    • If the drawing is very complex, use a larger paper size (e.g. 8.5" x 14")
    • Choose landscape mode if the drawing is wider than it is high
  2. Use the Object-Scale command sequence to expand the image to the full size of the page
  3. Save the image as a GIF
  4. If the simple method described above does not preserve tiny but important details, then save the image as a 300 dpi TIFF from ChemDraw and the use another program to convert that TIFF to a GIF
  5. Upload the graphic into oasys by answer Yes to "Does your abstract contain an image?"

Alternately:

  • We recommend that you create your image in a chemical drawing or graphing package and save it in this software as a GIF or JPEG file if possible. In OASYS, add your GIF or JPEG graphic to the end of your abstract by typing in the abstract text box and answering Yes to the question "Does your abstract contain an image?". This will prompt you to upload the graphic, so you must know the file name and location.
  • If you have multiple images, it is recommended that you create the images in a drawing package and save them as GIF or JPEG. Prepare your abstract using a word processor or HTML editor, inserting the GIF or JPEG images where appropriate. Save the file in HTML format. When you submit your abstract, choose the option to upload an HTML file, and answer Yes to "Does your abstract contain an image?".
  • When you view a shrunken image on screen, it might not be very legible. Very thin lines, for example, tend to disappear when an image is displayed at less than its natural size. Nonetheless, such an image might look quite alright when published. Why? Because the resolution of a computer screen is many times poorer than the resolution of print on paper. Thus, a line so thin that it becomes invisible on a computer screen can often be reproduced quite nicely on paper."
  • If the image was created in a drawing application such as Adobe Illustrator or Macromedia Freehand, make sure that the smallest numbers and letters are at least 10 pixels high, and preferably 20 pixels high. Then save it as a GIF or JPEG file.
  • Most word processors will allow you to paste a GIF or JPG (JPEG) into a document and easily adjust the display size of the image. To preserve the original image resolution make sure that you link the image to the document rather than simply pasting it in place. In MSWord the command sequence is:
    - Insert
    - Picture
    - From File
    - (select the image)
    - (check the "Link to file" checkbox)
    - (uncheck the "Save with document" checkbox)
    - Insert
    You can then save the document as an HTML file that will reference the original GIF or JPG image. In this way, the original image resolution is preserved.
  • If you have no other way of creating a GIF or JPG file, most word processors (e.g. WordPerfect and MSWord) will allow you to paste any other bitmap image (e.g. TIFF or BMP file) or vector graphic (WMF, PNG) into a document. Some word processors will allow you to directly insert other vector graphic images from an application such as ChemDraw or ISIS Draw. Do not just link such an image to the document. (In MSWord uncheck the "Link to file" checkbox.) Do not reduce the display size of the image, but instead leave at its original size or, preferably, as large as it can be on a single page. Then when you save this document as an HTML file any bitmapped image or vector graphic imaged contained in it will usually be saved as a separate GIF file. (Look for a .gif file created in the same directory at the same time as the .html file.) While convenient, this is not a recommended method for creating a GIF image. The resulting image is produced at low resolution -- the rough equivalent of 72 dpi. This is why we recommend making the image as large as possible before making the conversion from the .doc or .wpd format to HTML format. But once the document has been saved as an HTML file and that GIF image created, you can safely change the display size of the image in the HTML document without further degrading its resolution.
  • Some word processors (e.g. WordPerfect and MS Word) allow you to create or to paste into a document a vector graphic (e.g. WMF) or to copy images directly from a vector graphic drawing application (such as ChemDraw or ISIS draw). If you then save this word processor document in HTML format, any vector graphic contained in the document will usually be saved as a separate GIF. (Look for a .gif file created in the same directory at the same time as the .html file.) While convenient, this is not a recommended method for creating a GIF image. Vector graphics will be converted to GIFs at low resolution -- the rough equivalent of 72 dpi. Thus, if you want to include an image in the abstract as you compose it with a word processor, we recommend that you first save your image as a GIF or JPG file, and then insert that image into the document as described by recommendation (e) above.
  • Several HTML editors, such as Netscape Composer, allow you to drag a bitmap image into a document. When that document is saved is saved as a .html file, any image contained in the document will be saved as a separate GIF or JPEG file. (Look for .gif or .jpg files created in the same directory at the same time as the .html file.) The resolution of this image will be the same as the original bitmap image.
  • If none of the methods described above are available to you, but you have access to a scanner, then scan from a drawing on paper. We recommend that you scan in grayscale mode, at a resolution of 300 dpi if the image is less than 4.5 inches wide, at a resolution of 200 dpi if it is more than 4.5 but less than 6 inches wide, and at 150 dpi if it is over 6 inches wide.
  • There are many image editors, such as Adobe Photoshop, that will open different kinds of image files and save them in GIF or JPEG format.
  • If you do not have any of the applications described above, but you do have a bitmap (.bmp) image to be included in your abstract, you might be interested in a free "bitmap-to-GIF" converter.
  • For more information, read Tips for Making Better Images.

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