Self-assembled lipid-nanocrystal vesicle hybrids as theranostic devices for cancer

COLL 100

Wafa' T. Al-Jamal, Wafa.al-jamal@pharmacy.ac.uk, Khuloud T. Al-Jamal, Khuloud.al-jamal@pharmacy.ac.uk, and Kostas Kostarelos, kostas.kostarelos@pharmacy.ac.uk. Nanomedicine laboratory , Centre for Drug Delivery, The School of Pharmacy, University of London, 29-39 Brunswick Square, London, WC1N 1AX, United Kingdom
Nanocrystals are novel nanomaterials that have been used to label cells in vitro or tissues in vivo. Seeking novel multimodal therapeutics, we have demonstrated that a variety of nanocrystals and lipid components can self-assemble into nanoscale, lipid-nanocrystal vesicle hybrids which were successfully used to label cells in vitro and tumor xenografts in vivo. Moreover, we assessed the fate and interaction of the lipid-nanocrystal vesicle hybrids with the biological milieu in animal models after local and systemic administration. Tissue biodistribution, affinity and blood pharmacokinetic parameters were found to be dependent on multiple factors, primarily governed by the nanocrystal characteristics and the lipid coat components. By varying such parameters, we could develop and evaluate pharmacologically various lipid-nanocrystal vesicle hybrid systems of versatile features. The data obtained indicates that such lipid-nanocrystal hybrids can be considered as effective, biocompatible platforms for combinatory diagnostic and therapeutic biomedical applications.