Single-walled carbon nanotubes as near-infrared optical biosensors of DNA structure

PRES 58

Daniel A Heller, dheller1@uiuc.edu1, Jong Hyun Choi2, Claudia Hoebartner1, Tsun-Kwan Yeung3, Dhaval Patel2, Brittany M. Martinez2, and Michael S. Strano, strano@uiuc.edu2. (1) Department of Chemistry, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, RAL 104 Box 93-5 MC 712, 600 S. Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801, (2) Department of Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Roger Adams Laboratory, 600 S. Mathews Ave, Urbana, IL 61801, (3) Department of Physics, University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana, IL 61801
Single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWNT) exhibit sensitivity to structural changes of DNA non-covalently bound to its surface, permitting optical transduction. The intrinsic near-infrared fluorescence of SWNT is used to detect these changes from within single cells and live tissues. Biological media is transparent to near-infrared radiation between 800 and 1400 nm, allowing for optical detection of nanotube emission through highly absorptive or scattering tissues. Nucleic acid encapsulation of SWNT imparts biocompatibility to the nanotube complexes which exhibit uptake into mammalian cells and tissues without cytotoxicity. The DNA-nanotube complexes are employed as chemical sensors in single cells and tissue matrices where the nanotubes' photostability allows for detection of DNA structural modifications in real-time.