Synthesis of highly methacrylated hyaluronic acid hydrogels for bone tissue engineering

POLY 375

Sidi A Bencherif, sabenche@andrew.cmu.edu1, Jeffrey A Sheehan, jasheeha@andrew.cmu.edu2, Abiraman Srinivasan, abiraman@andrew.cmu.edu3, Lynn M Walker, lwalker@andrew.cmu.edu2, and Newell R Washburn, washburn@andrew.cmu.edu4. (1) Department of Chemistry, Carnegie Mellon University, 4400 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, (2) Department of Chemical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15219, (3) Department of Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, Pittsburgh, PA 15213, (4) Departments of Chemistry and Biomedical Engineering, Carnegie Mellon University, 4400 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh, PA 15217
The physiological activity of hyaluronic acid polymers makes it a promising material for a variety of biomedical applications. The development of HA-based hydrogel scaffolds with improved mechanical property against degradation and biochemical functionality may enhance their application for tissue engineering. In this work, we have developed and characterized a series of low viscosity photopolymerizable macromers with different degree of methacrylation (between 14% and 70%) based on HA-Glycidyl Methacrylate conjugates (HAGM). These macromers were subsequently photopolymerized into networks to form hydrogels with a wide range of physical properties. Preliminary in-vitro studies show that these HA-based hydrogels are cytocompatible, and the introduction of RGD peptide promotes cell adhesion and proliferation to confluence after 5 days of incubation. These HAGM systems seem to be good candidates for tissue engineering and can be used for bone tissue regeneration.