Total platinum in urine of women exposed to silicone breast implants and in their children conceived after implantation by ICP-MS

ANYL 510

S. V. M. Maharaj, Department of Chemistry, American University, Washington, DC 20016 and E. D. Lykissa, ExperTox, Inc, Deer Park, TX 77536.
Inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) was used to determine the total platinum (Pt) concentration in urine samples of women exposed to silicone and saline breast implants. Total Pt concentration was also determined in urine samples of children conceived before and after their mothers were implanted with silicone breast implants. Mean Pt concentration in urine samples of women exposed to silicone breast implants was higher [48.50 m g/L (range, n.d.-219.00; n=41)] than in that of the general population. Mean Pt concentration in urine samples of children conceived after their mothers were implanted with silicone breast implants was higher [88.63 m g/L (range, 15.30-382.00; n=7)] than in children conceived before their mothers were implanted [12.60 m g/L (range, 0.10-23.30; n=4)], and higher than in that of the general population. Women exposed to saline breast implants did not have elevated urinary Pt levels. Past environmental exposure of subjects indicates that silicone breast implants are the most likely source of the elevated urinary Pt levels in women exposed to these devices, and in their children conceived after implantation.
 

General Papers
1:30 PM-4:50 PM, Thursday, 1 September 2005 Washington DC Convention Center -- 153, Oral

Division of Analytical Chemistry

The 230th ACS National Meeting, in Washington, DC, Aug 28-Sept 1, 2005